Links

Links
Front-load your link text with the relevant terms and make them active and specific. Always link to online services first. Offer offline alternatives afterwards, when possible.

Taken from:https://www.gov.uk/guidance/style-guide/a-to-z-of-gov-uk-style

Link text evidence:
Text showing links should be meaningful, not click here or more. Actions should start with a verb: Chadwick-Dias, McNulty and Tullis (2003), cited in Redish (2012) found that users, especially older ones, hesitated on links like 'Accounts', but less so with 'Go to accounts'.

Research by Lynch (1997) cited in Spyradakis cautions against the use of links embedded in the middle of a sentence. He suggested that embedded (associative) links can distract the reader. He says that such links may slow down readers who are scanning because they will need to stop and read text surrounding the embedded link. This suggests that authors should place such links at the end of a sentence where they will least disrupt the syntax.

Redish, however, notes that embedded definition links that open a small window and don’t change the screen are not disruptive.

Taken from: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/206088/GOV.UK_content_principles.pdf

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